Concerts in Costume

Event Information

Venue(s):
Irving Hall

Price: $.50; reserved seat, $.50 extra

Event Type:
Variety / Vaudeville

Performance Forces:
Vocal

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
19 January 2016

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

23 Apr 1867, Evening
24 Apr 1867, Evening
25 Apr 1867, Evening
26 Apr 1867, Evening
27 Apr 1867, Evening

Program Details

At each representation will be presented a series of impersonations, introducing in elegant costume, lyric pieces by Mrs. Paul.
Imitations of tenors, Reeves and Brignoli; Includes Flotow's Martha, “Ach, so fromm, ach! So traut,” sung by Mrs. Paul.

Performers and/or Works Performed

2)
Composer(s): Traditional
Participants:  Mrs. Howard Paul
3)
aka Ship on fire, man the life boat, The; Ship's on fire, The
Composer(s): Russell
Text Author: Mackay
Participants:  Mrs. Howard Paul
4)
Composer(s): Russell
Text Author: Mackay
Participants:  Mrs. Howard Paul
6)
aka French sneezing song
Composer(s): Russel
Participants:  Mrs. Howard Paul
7)
aka Impersonations of tenors; Imitation of Brignoli
Participants:  Mrs. Howard Paul
8)
aka M'appari tutt’amor; My raptured gaze; Lionel’s air; Ah, so pure
Composer(s): Flotow
Participants:  Mrs. Howard Paul
9)
aka Life of Julius Caesar
Participants:  Howard Paul
10)
aka Napoleon III
Participants:  Howard Paul

Citations

1)
Announcement: New-York Times, 22 April 1867, 4.
2)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 23 April 1867, 2.
3)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 23 April 1867, 7.
4)
Advertisement: New-York Daily Tribune, 23 April 1867, 2.
5)
Review: New York Herald, 25 April 1867, 7.

“Those really clever artists, the Pauls, have commenced a two weeks engagement at Irving Hall, and last night they gave one of their inimitable programmes, which unite the attractions of a public entertainment with that of a private or parlor soirée. We know of nothing more thoroughly enjoyable than Mrs. Howard Paul’s superb voice, her scenas and Therese’s sneezing in Russel’s descriptive song, her life-like imitations of Reeves and Brignoli, her comic delineation of the unprotected female, which even Dickens has pronounced a perfect piece of acting, and Mr. Howard Paul’s impersonation of the Sphynx of the Seine and commentator of Caesar. Such a voice as Mrs. Howard Paul is gifted with is a phenomenon at the present day, and in opera or oratorio, it would create an immense sensation.”

6)
Review: New-York Times, 25 April 1867, 5.

“Mr. and Mrs. Howard Paul are giving, at Irving Hall, some farewell repetitions of the pleasant musical entertainment in which they first introduced themselves to this community. A dozen songs in costume constitute an evening’s performance, which may be enjoyed without any serious effort. Mr. and Mrs. Paul perform their picturesque monologues with their wonted skill and spirit, and Mrs. Paul has introduced a richly droll addition to her previous clever scenes, in an imitation of the sweet tenor voice and unbearable manners of Sig. Brignoli. A little comedy in itself, also, is Mrs. Paul’s extraordinary representation of two very different people at the same moment.”

7)
Review: New York Herald, 26 April 1867, 7.

“…A large house greeted Mr. and Mrs. Howard Paul last night at Irving Hall. The performance was slightly changed form the first night. It is really a treat to hear such a contralto as nature has gifted Mrs. Howard Paul with. Her imitation of Brignoli and M’appari from Martha is almost perfect in style, mannerism and artistic rendering.”

8)
Announcement: New York Clipper, 27 April 1867, 21, 2d col., top .
9)
Review: New-York Daily Tribune, 29 April 1867, 8.

“Mr. and Mrs. Howard Paul who have established themselves at Irving Hall, merit the especial attention of persons who enjoy a light, cheerful, and laughable entertainment. Music and the drama meet and blend in the performance of these artists. Both can act, and Mrs. Paul, in particular, can sing extremely well. We described their entertainment not very long ago. It is now to be noted that they have introduced new features wherewith to distinguish this their Farewell Engagement in New York. Mrs. Paul gives an imitation of Brignoli, which is at once a perfect copy and a pointed satire, personates Sims Reeve, and sings ‘The Song of the Reveler’ and ‘The Ship on Fire’ in [?] of which songs she has acquired a [?] for both taste and vigor of execution. [Mr. Paul?] among other things, personates the projected  [?] at Exposition. His Napoleon is a true work [?]. Mr. Harrison, under whose management this entertainment is given, [fitly?] styles it ‘Grand Concerts in Costume.’”   “Mr. and Mrs. Howard Paul who have established themselves at Irving Hall, merit the especial attention of persons who enjoy a light, cheerful, and laughable entertainment. Music and the drama meet and blend in the performance of these artists. Both can act, and Mrs. Paul, in particular, can sing extremely well. We described their entertainment not very long ago. It is now to be noted that they have introduced new features wherewith to distinguish this their Farewell Engagement in New York. Mrs. Paul gives an imitation of Brignoli, which is at once a perfect copy and a pointed satire, personates Sims Reeve, and sings ‘The Song of the Reveler’ and ‘The Ship on Fire’ in [?] of which songs she has acquired a [?] for both taste and vigor of execution. [Mr. Paul?] among other things, personates the projected  [?] at Exposition. His Napoleon is a true work [?]. Mr. Harrison, under whose management this entertainment is given, [fitly?] styles it ‘Grand Concerts in Costume.’”