Granddad Joe

Event Information

Venue(s):
Wood's Minstrel Hall

Proprietor / Lessee:
Henry [Wood's Minstrels] Wood

Manager / Director:
Cool [Wood's] White

Price: $.25

Event Type:
Minstrel

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
17 September 2013

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

09 Mar 1863, 7:45 PM
10 Mar 1863, 7:45 PM
11 Mar 1863, 7:45 PM
12 Mar 1863, 7:45 PM
13 Mar 1863, 7:45 PM
14 Mar 1863, 7:45 PM

Program Details



Performers and/or Works Performed

2)
aka Grand dad Joe
Text Author: Hamilton

Citations

1)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 08 March 1863, 7.
2)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 09 March 1863, 7.
“Mr. Wood respectfully announces that some time since the advertisement for A Prize Play, the price offered for which was $250. There were many competitors for the prize; the success of one was T. J. Hamilton Esq. of Brooklyn. The piece, which is entitled Granddad Joe, inaugurates an entirely new style of Ethiopian performances and has been in rehearsal for some time.”
3)
Announcement: New York Herald, 09 March 1863, 8.
Minstrels Section: “Bryants’ and Wood’s . . . continue to receive the most ample patronage, which they attract by their pleasing performances.” Theatre Section: “Henry Wood has secured a prize play called ‘Grandad Joe’ . . . with new scenery and appointments. This is a new idea in the burnt cork business.”
4)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 12 March 1863, 7.
In addition to main ad, there is a small ad that says: “WANTED – A FIRST TENOR SINGER FOR WOOD’S MINSTRELS. Apply at Wood’s Minstrel Hall . . . from 11 to 12 o’clock A.M. [sic], to Cool White, Stage Manager.”
5)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 14 March 1863, 7.
6)
Review: New York Herald, 16 March 1863, 5.
“’Grand Dad Joe,’ the new negro play just brought out at Wood’s Minstrels is as great a production in its way as ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin.’ All the best artists are in the cast, and as the play bill says: ‘It alternately elicits smiles and tears.’”
7)
Review: New York Clipper, 28 March 1863.

     Mr. Wood very wisely withdrew the play of 'Grand Dad Joe,' after its ninth representation. Mr. W. gave it a very fair trial, placed it handsomely upon the stage, and advertised it thoroughly; but it failed to satisfy the wants of the patrons of the hall, and he at once returned to the old style of minstrelsy, which never fails to attract large and delighted audiences."