Thomas Popular Garden Concert: 12th and 13th

Event Information

Venue(s):
Terrace Garden

Proprietor / Lessee:
7th Ave. between 58th and 59th Sts. Central Park Garden

Conductor(s):
Theodore Thomas [see also Thomas Orchestra]

Price: $.25; $10 season pass

Event Type:
Orchestral

Performance Forces:
Instrumental

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
15 November 2017

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

23 Jun 1866, 4:30 PM
23 Jun 1866, 8:00 PM

Program Details

The programs for these concerts are not provided in the citations. Music in Gotham lists as the program all of the pieces mentioned in the reviews; it is impossible to determine whether these were performed in the afternoon or evening.

Announcement in the New York Herald incorrectly states a start time for 4pm for the afternoon concert.

Performers and/or Works Performed

2)
aka Avant
Composer(s): Gung'l
3)
Composer(s): Verdi
4)
Composer(s): Verdi
5)
Composer(s): Flotow
6)
Composer(s): Rossini
7)
aka Introduction
Composer(s): Hérold
8)
aka Poet and peasant overture
Composer(s): Suppé
9)
aka Felsenmühle zu Estalières; Mill on the rock; Moulin de rocher
Composer(s): Reissiger
10)
aka Narren-Galopp
Composer(s): Gung'l
11)
aka Poptpourri from Il Trovatore
Composer(s): Verdi
12)
aka Fantasie on La petite tambour
Composer(s): David [composer]

Citations

1)
Announcement: New York Herald, 23 June 1866, 5.

“Mr. Theodore Thomas will give an orchestral concert to-day at Koch’s Terrace Garden, Third avenue and Fifty-eighth street, at four o’clock P.M. [sic], and another at eight P.M.”

2)
Advertisement: New-Yorker Staats-Zeitung und Herold, 23 June 1866.

No program given; 4:30pm start time for afternoon concert.

3)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 23 June 1866, 7.

THIS (SATURDAY) AFTERNOON AND EVENING,

AFTERNOON AT 4 1/2, EVENING AT 8.

TWO TWO TWO TWO

THEO. THOMAS' HIGH SUCCESSFUL

POPULAR ORCHESTRAL GARDEN CONCERTS

at the above named and favorably known resort.

A NEW AND BRILLIANT PROGRAMME FOR EACH CONCERT.

Visitors to the afternoon concert can remain for the evening concert

WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE.

During unfavorable weather the concert will be given in the large and elegant hall connected with the establishment."

4)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 23 June 1866, 7.

No program given; 4:30pm start time for afternoon concert.

5)
Review: New York Herald, 24 June 1866, 5.

“It was a considerable undertaking of Mr. Thomas to give concerts every evening during the summer, at any garden, especially with his own orchestra, which comprises some of the best musicians in the city. We are glad to state that these concerts have so far proved an unqualified success. As an evidence of the fact, it is only necessary to say that on Friday night there were upwards of fifteen hundred people in Terrace Garden, and yesterday at the matinee and evening concert the grounds were completely crowded. Of yesterday’s programme the most noteworthy pieces were the ‘Avant’ March, by Gungl, the charming quartette from Rigoletto, the best thing Verdi ever wrote, the overtures to Nabuco [sic], Martha, Semiramis, Zampa, Poet and Peasant (new) and Felsenmuehle, and a little thing by Gungl termed the Fool’s Galop. Of the style in which these pieces were performed we may judge by the vociferous encores demanded in each instance. The potpourri from the Trovatore was also excellent. The orchestra gave color, spirit and expression to each piece. We wonder not then at the success of such concerts. The gardens are very handsomely laid out with ‘all the modern improvements.’ All night the effect is very beautiful. Those queer little German globules, suspended in every direction, the numerous groups around the tables drinking in wine and music at the same time, the occasional rush of a train past on the Harlem Railroad, and the waving foliage above, formed a scene such as some hasheesh drunken Arab alone would dream of.”

6)
Review: New-York Daily Tribune, 27 June 1866.

“Notwithstanding the variable weather of Saturday, Mr. Thomas’s afternoon concert at Terrace Garden was largely attended by a very fashionable audience. The programme consisted of overtures, waltzes, gallops and operatic selections, all of them admirably arranged, and performed with a spirit and a close attention to artistic coloring, which reflect the highest credit upon their leader, Mr. Thomas. The selections are most judicious, consisting of light and elegant compositions, well-contrasted as to character, and all of them calculated to please a miscellaneous audience, and also the most critical judgment. Mr. Thomas has shown himself admirably fitted to control such an undertaking, for although his instincts are well-known to be the classic in art, he has wisely kept them in the background on this occasion, and at the same time he has arranged programmes to suit the most fastidious tastes. The public warmly appreciate his efforts, and show their satisfaction by their loud plaudits and frequent encores.

The Solo performances at these concerts attract much attention, and as the soloists are all members of the orchestra, some notion may be formed of the character of the band which Mr. Thomas conducts at Terrace Garden. Mr. Bernstein, second violin in the orchestra, performed David’s Fantasie on La Petite Tambour, a very difficult piece, with much grace and finish. He has an excellent tone, his execution is neat and clear, and he exhibits both taste and sentiment. He gained on each occasion a hearty and well deserved encore. The attendance on Saturday evening was very large indeed. There must have been over 2,500 persons present. The performance was excellent, and the programme popular and pleasing. A concert will be given every night this week, and one on Saturday afternoon. Up to this time these concerts have proved completely successful, but as the weather becomes warmer and more settled, the success will be more marked in its results, for amusements out of doors will become as mucg a necessity as it is now the fashion.”