Maretzek Italian Opera: Robert le diable

Event Information

Venue(s):
Academy of Music

Manager / Director:
Max Maretzek

Event Type:
Opera

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
24 March 2019

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

19 Feb 1869, Evening

Performers and/or Works Performed

1)
aka Robert the devil; Robert der Teufel
Composer(s): Meyerbeer
Text Author: Scribe, Delavigne
Participants:  Maretzek Italian Opera Company;  Giuseppe B. [basso] Antonucci (role: Bertram);  Isabella McCulloch (role: Isabella);  Anna de La Grange (role: Alice);  Mlle. [dancer] Wesmael (role: Helene, dancer);  Pasquale Brignoli (role: Robert);  Theodore Habelmann (role: Raimbaud)

Citations

1)
Advertisement: Courrier des √Čtats-Unis, 13 February 1869.
2)
Announcement: New York Post, 18 February 1869.
3)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 18 February 1869, 7.
4)
Announcement: New-York Daily Tribune, 18 February 1869, 4.
5)
Announcement: New York Sun, 19 February 1869.
6)
Announcement: New-York Times, 19 February 1869, 5.
7)
Review: New-York Times, 20 February 1869, 4.

“There was what may fairly be called a brilliant audience at the Academy last night, to witness the first production this season of Meyerbeer’s admirable work, ‘Roberto Diable.’  Even under maltreatment, this opera pleases the public, and we all know how much it has been maltreated.  With a musician at the head of affairs, and a full company, its beauties are spared; and this was eminently so last night.  It would not be easy to find a better quintette than that supplied by Mr. Maretzek.  The Alice of Mme. Lagrange is graceful in conception, and clear, and even powerful in execution.  Miss McCulloch is again suited in the part of Isabella, and steadily advances in public esteem.  Brignoli and Antonucci are both well known in their respective rôles, and were in good voice last night.  So also was Herr Habelmann.  It is a pity that this gentleman persists in singing in German.  By this time he ought to be able to learn a part in Italian.  He is too valuable to be exiled to the German stage, but it is aggravating to hear a polyglot performance.  The duo in the second act between Raimbuldo and Bertram, although admirably sung, lost much of its effect from this cause.  The chorus was good, save when it descended to Hades, and then, perhaps, properly it became infernal.  The orchestra under Mr. Maretzek was well handled, and the performance in all respects may be recorded as a success which will certainly bear repetition.”