Thomas Popular Garden Concert: 24th

Event Information

Venue(s):
Central Park Garden

Manager / Director:
J. [manager] Gosche

Conductor(s):
Theodore Thomas [see also Thomas Orchestra]

Price: $.35; $2.35 private boxes

Event Type:
Orchestral

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
3 October 2019

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

01 Jun 1869, 8:00 PM

Performers and/or Works Performed

2)
Composer(s): Mendelssohn-Bartholdy
3)
Composer(s): Flotow
5)
Composer(s): Beriot
6)
aka Concert overture
Composer(s): Rietz
7)
aka Sangerslust; Sangerlust
Composer(s): Strauss
8)
aka The Standard Bearer; The Standard Watch; Der Fahnenträger; Der Fahnen Träger; The Warrior Bard
Composer(s): Lindpaintner
9)
aka Variations burlesques; Cara mia mamma; Carnival of Venice
Composer(s): Ernst
10)
Composer(s): Unknown composer
11)
Composer(s): Levy
12)
aka Spring sounds; Sounds of spring; Fruhlings-Klange
Composer(s): Herzog
13)
aka Champagne galop; Champagner Galopp; Champaign
Composer(s): Lumbye

Citations

1)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 01 June 1869, 12.
2)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 01 June 1869, 7.
3)
Advertisement: New-York Daily Tribune, 01 June 1869, 7.
4)
Article: New-York Daily Tribune, 01 June 1869, 5.

““The excellent concerts given every evening by Mr. Theodore Thomas at the Central Park Gardens are in the full tide of prosperity. A moderately pleasant evening is sure to see the hall and garden well filled, and on fine nights the crowd is enormous. It is a very interesting crowd to look at; merry, well-dressed, well-conducted, perpetually in motion, strolling out of doors, through the concert room, up stairs [sic] to the boxes, out into the dining-hall; a crowd constantly renewed, for most of the people come for only an hour, and are succeeded by fresh pleasure seekers as soon as they go away. Though the audience is forever going out, it seems therefore never to diminish. The arrangements of the hall and garden—particularly the garden—have been very much improved since last year, and further alterations, including the addition of a promenade room on the south of the hall, are now in progress. The music, furnished by Mr. Thomas’s forty well-trained players, is of course very good, and is also well suited to the character of the entertainment, being light-some and popular, and yet comprising very little trash. Mr. Levy, the cornet-player, is announced on the bills for two pieces every night; but he never gets off with less than four or five. His ‘Maud Waltz’ has taken the public ear, and is nightly followed by a recall. On Sundays there are two concerts.”