Second Gottschalk Concert of the Last Series

Event Information

Venue(s):
Irving Hall

Conductor(s):
Pedro de Abella

Price: $.50; $1 reserved

Event Type:
Chamber (includes Solo)

Performance Forces:
Instrumental, Vocal

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
30 July 2010

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

19 May 1863, Evening

Program Details



Performers and/or Works Performed

Citations

1)
Announcement: New York Post, 15 May 1863, 2.

2)
Announcement: New-York Times, 18 May 1863.

3)
Announcement: New-York Daily Tribune, 18 May 1863.

4)
Announcement: New York Herald, 18 May 1863.
Mistakenly says: “Mr. Gottschalk’s second grand concert takes place this evening.”
5)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 18 May 1863, 7.

6)
Announcement: New-York Times, 19 May 1863, 4.

7)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 19 May 1863, 7.
Performers.
8)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 19 May 1863, 12.

9)
Announcement: New York Post, 19 May 1863, 2.

10)
Announcement: Courrier des √Čtats-Unis, 19 May 1863.
“Without elevating his ambition too high and leaving his politics on the side, Gottschalk offers us at Irving Hall, one of those attractive evenings to which the public remains loyal.”

COMMENT: Interesting note about Gottschalk “leaving his politics on the side.”

11)
Review: New York Post, 22 May 1863, 2.
“Mr. Gottschalk’s concerts this week have been as successful as ever.  The mere announcement of his name seems to be sufficient to draw the inevitable crowd.  He has the faculty of gathering about him a wealth of musical ability which no other performer appears to have discovered, and the ladies, whose exquisite playing has delighted the audiences at these concerts, have made for themselves a genuine and valuable professional reputation, while the new baritone, Mr. Campbell, has taken all by surprise. . . . The attention of musical men has been particularly directed during these recent concerts to the new Chickering pianos used, that firm having, after long experimenting, invented an instrument which, in addition to the brilliancy of tone and lightness of touch peculiar to their pianos, has the power of producing a volume of sound which it has not been easy to combine with the qualities first mentioned.  The new experiment has now been thoroughly tried at several concerts and has resulted satisfactorily.”
12)
Review: Dwight's Journal of Music, 30 May 1863, 36.
“Gottschalk has been reveling in all his brilliancy and fascination, and, with Sanderson, Miss Krowlikowska, Mlle. Barnetche, Mr. Castle, Campbell and the Bretto children, has been giving concerts and matinées without number.”  Signed TWM.