Charlotte Varian New York Debut Concert

Event Information

Venue(s):
Niblo's Concert Saloon

Price: $.50; $.75 reserved

Event Type:
Chamber (includes Solo)

Performance Forces:
Instrumental, Vocal

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
1 October 2014

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

20 Jan 1864, 8:00 PM

Program Details

“Annie Laurie," “Comin’ thro’ the rye" and “Edinboro town” were all encored.

Performers and/or Works Performed

2)
Composer(s): Verdi
Participants:  Charlotte Varian
3)
aka Ah! non giunge uman pensiero
Composer(s): Bellini [composer]
Participants:  Charlotte Varian
4)
aka Thou art so near and yet so far ; Beloved star; Thou art so near
Composer(s): Reichardt [composer]
Text Author: Oxenford
Participants:  Charlotte Varian
5)
aka Laughing song; Eclat de rire
Composer(s): Auber
Participants:  Charlotte Varian
6)
Composer(s): Undetermined
Participants:  Charlotte Varian
7)
aka Coming through the rye
Text Author: Burns
Participants:  Charlotte Varian
8)
aka Edinboro town; 'Twas within a mile o' Edinburgh town
Composer(s): Hook [comp.]
Participants:  Charlotte Varian
9)
Composer(s): Donizetti
Participants:  George Simpson;  Charlotte Varian
10)
aka Favorite ballads ; Ballads and warblings; Beautiful ballads
Participants:  George Simpson
11)
aka Operatic selection, unidentified
Participants:  George Simpson
12)
Composer(s): Gottschalk

Citations

1)
Announcement: New York Post, 31 December 1863, 2.

2)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 14 January 1864.

3)
Announcement: New York Post, 16 January 1864, 2.

4)
Announcement: New York Post, 18 January 1864, 2.

“Niblo’s Saloon will, during the present week, be the scene of a great deal that is interesting…On Wednesday evening Madame Charlotte Varian gives a concert which promises to be one of the most brilliant of the season, introducing, as it does, to a New York audience a vocalist who comes to us with the most flattering testimonials.”

5)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 19 January 1864, 9.

6)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 19 January 1864, 7.

7)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 20 January 1864.

8)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 20 January 1864, 7.

9)
Review: New York Post, 21 January 1864, 2.

“Madame Varian’s Concert at Niblo’s Saloon last night was one of those pleasant successes which vary the dull monotony of concert going. The audience was appreciative enough to nearly double the length of the performance by encoring almost every piece in the programme, and the style in which the pieces were rendered justified the applause. Madame Varian has already obtained a most favorable reputation in the provinces, and on the occasion of her New York début showed the possession of many attributes which secure the success of a first-class concert singer. With a very sweet and flexible voice, trained in the best Italian method; with a far greater share of personal attractions than is usually given to even American ladies; with an ease and grace of manner without any of the awkwardness of a novice, and yet with an utter freedom from the conventional mannerisms of the stage, this lady must be added to the list of concert singers who, like Carlotta Patti, are more appreciated abroad than at home. Madame Varian is an American, and has studied in Italy. She sang last night the ‘Ernani Involami,’ ‘Ah non giunge,’ Reichart’s melody ‘Beloved Star,’ Auber’s ‘Laughing Song,’ and, in response to encores, the familiar ballads, ‘Annie Laurie,’ ‘Comin’ thro’ the Rye,’ and ‘Edinboro Town.’ In ballad music she is peculiarly happy, and her ‘Annie Laurie’ is something to remember as well as listen to.

The concert was otherwise most enjoyable. Mr. Edward Hoffmann, the pianist, played Gottschalk’s fairy-like music with exquisite delicacy; Mr. Appy played the violin so admirably as to make everybody wonder that the man is not heard in public a great deal oftener; and Mr. Simpson sang, in his usual pleasant style, a ballad and an operatic selection, besides taking part in a duet [sic] from ‘Roberto Devereux.’”

10)
Review: Musical Review and World, 29 January 1864, 40.
Very brief mention.