Wood’s Minstrels

Event Information

Venue(s):
Wood's Minstrel Hall

Proprietor / Lessee:
Henry [Wood's Minstrels] Wood

Price: $.30; $.50 Reserved

Event Type:
Minstrel

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
5 January 2015

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

28 Nov 1864, 7:30 PM
29 Nov 1864, 7:30 PM
30 Nov 1864, 7:30 PM
01 Dec 1864, 7:30 PM
02 Dec 1864, 7:30 PM
03 Dec 1864, 7:30 PM

Program Details



Performers and/or Works Performed

3)
Composer(s): Isaacs
Text Author: Million
4)
aka When I used to work
Composer(s): Warden [composer]
5)
Composer(s): Böhm
Participants:  Edward [minstrel] Haslam
6)
aka African Camille
Text Author: Brickner
7)
Composer(s): Unknown composer

Citations

1)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 27 November 1864.
“Five comedians.  The best quartet.  The best instrumentalists in the profession in their challenge programme.”
2)
Review: New York Clipper, 03 December 1864, 270.
“Wood’s Minstrels did a big business last week. On Thanksgiving, two performances were given, netting over $1,000. Every night the house was crowded. . . .Wood’s Minstrel Hall is one of our most popular places of amusement in the city, and is well patronised [sic].”

3)
Review: New York Clipper, 10 December 1864, 278.
“At Wood’s Minstrels a slight falling off was manifested last week, as well as at other places of amusement in the city, owing to the fear that the public have of a fire occurring; but this panic as it is will soon wear off, and everything will be ‘hunkeydora’ again. [For more information on the fire that instigated this public fear, see 11/25/64: Articles on Rebel Plot to Burn New York.] A capital programme was offered by the “black birds” last week. Mr. Henry sang “In the Meadow” and “McCollen Astore” in a beautiful style. Purdy created considerable fun by singing “Tapioca,” one of the most popular songs in the business. Haslan’s Boehm Flute Solo is one of the features of the evening. It is well executed. The burlesque of “Camille” was run off in quick style by Purdy and Hughes. Mr. Mullenhauer [sic] gave a solo on the violin. This gentleman is a real artist, and knows how to handle that instrument.”