Steinway Hall

Event Information

Venue(s):
Steinway Hall

Price: $1.50 reserved; $1

Event Type:
Chamber (includes Solo)

Performance Forces:
Instrumental, Vocal

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
18 September 2017

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

29 Apr 1868, Evening

Program Details

Theodore Schreiner served as accompanist.

Performers and/or Works Performed

2)
aka Faust, redowa
Composer(s): Gounod
Participants:  Minnie Hauk
3)
aka Non e ver
Composer(s): Mattei
Participants:  Ignatz Pollak
4)
Composer(s): Chopin
Participants:  Alide Topp
5)
Composer(s): Beethoven
Participants:  Alide Topp
6)
Composer(s): Raff
Participants:  Alide Topp
7)
Composer(s): Meyerbeer
Participants:  Minnie Hauk
8)
Composer(s): Flotow
Participants:  Ignatz Pollak

Citations

1)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 23 April 1868, 7.
2)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 24 April 1868.
3)
Announcement: New York Herald, 27 April 1868, 3.
4)
Announcement: New-York Times, 28 April 1868, 5.
5)
Announcement: New-Yorker Staats-Zeitung und Herold, 28 April 1868, 8.
6)
Review: New-York Daily Tribune, 30 April 1868, 5.

“Miss Alide Topp gave an excellent concert last night at Steinway Hall to an enthusiastic audience—one of the best concerts which we have heard in a long while. The young lady herself is unquestionably one of the foremost female pianists in the world—incomparably the finest who has ever been heard in America, and when we consider that she has not yet passed the blossom of girlhood we may fairly style her a prodigy. In the weird and fascinating ballad in A flat major, by Chopin, which she played first, she manifested even more strikingly than usual her power over the nicest technicalities of her art, and a conception of the softer poetical resources of the piano which those who have heard her only in the storm and flash of her favorite Liszt were perhaps not fully prepared to expect. The curiously beautiful piece which she played on being recalled after this ballad was rather less effective, but displayed still better than the ballad the peculiar excellence of her style. Not only was her own performance admirable, but she had unusually good assistance. Miss Minnie Hauck, who is seldom heard in the concert room, but is always a charming artist, sang the well-known waltz from Gounod’s ‘Romeo and Juliet,’ a familiar Lied of Meyerbeers [sic], and a very pretty encore song. She did them all well, especially the Lied, and received abundant and richly deserved applause. Mr. Pollak sang Mattei’s popular Non e ver, the Drinking Song from ‘Martha,’ and one other piece; Mr. G. W. Morgan performed two of his favorite organ solos; and Mr. Wenzel Kopta contributed some excellent violin playing.”

7)
Review: New-York Times, 01 May 1868, 5.

“Miss Alide Topp was unfortunate in the weather on Wednesday evening. It stormed obstinately up to the hour of opening, and then maliciously became fine.The artists who assisted the lady were Miss Minnie Hauck, Mr. Ignatz Pollak, Mr. Kopta, Mr. G. W. Morgan, and Theodore Schreiner (accompanist.) Our young prima donna sang Gounod's commonplace waltz from ‘Romeo and Juliet’ in a brilliant and easy way. It is not, however, in such bravura pieces that she is heard to much advantage. The air and variations in the second part, (‘Love told a flattering tale,’) was given with better effect. Miss Hauck is young and gifted. Her appearance is prepossessing, and her progress is marked and steady, but it is apparent that the lady still has much to learn, especially in equalizing the middle register of her voice. Her reception was enthusiastic, and she received two encores. Mr. Pollack sang Non e ver (which next to ‘Champagne Charlie’ seems to be the rage) with feeling. The gentleman possesses a fine sympathetic voice, and is always effective in the concert room. Mr. Kopta played two solos with his accustomed skill, but without his usual accuracy of intonation. Mr. G. W. Morgan was of course admirable on the organ. Last, but by no means least, was the fair beneficiare, Miss Topp. The first piece played by this fine artiste was Chopin's exquisite ‘Ballade in A flat major,’ the ambiguous yet delicate design of which was most exquisitely maintained. We have no recollection of ever having heard the lady to greater advantage. The ‘variations in F major,’ by Beethoven, are by no means entertaining in a concert room, whatever may be their merits in the salon. Even Miss Topp failed to produce an effect with them, and it is seldom that a pianist of her merit plays them in public. The lady’s performances terminated with the Raff ‘Polka de la Reine,’ a brilliant piece, which terminated the concert. Altogether it was an agreeable affair, and placed Miss Topp in a good light before the public.”