Complimentary Concert to Mme. Varian Hoffman

Event Information

Venue(s):
Apollo Hall

Manager / Director:
Antonio Barili

Price: $1.50 reserved; $1

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
2 August 2019

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

05 May 1869, 8:00 PM

Performers and/or Works Performed

2)
Composer(s): Verdi
Participants:  Charlotte Varian
3)
Composer(s): Gounod
Participants:  Charlotte Varian
4)
Composer(s): Millard
Text Author: Flagg
Participants:  Charlotte Varian
5)
aka Good night
Composer(s): Abt
Text Author: Seyffardt
Participants:  Theodore Habelmann
6)
aka Shadow dance; Schattentanz; Shadow song
Composer(s): Meyerbeer
Text Author: Barbier, Carré
7)
Composer(s): Muzio
8)
Composer(s): Bishop
Text Author: Payne

Citations

1)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 05 May 1869, 7.
2)
Review: New York Herald, 06 May 1869, 10.

“A large and very select audience assembled last evening at Apollo Hall to listen to the musical treat there offered. The stars of the evening were Madame Hoffman, Theodore Habelman and Gustavus F. Hall. Madame Hoffman was dressed in the most tasteful manner, and from the rare arrangement of various flowers was an allegorical representation of spring. The selections were among the best. The aria ‘Ah forse e lui,’ from ‘Traviata,’ ‘Ave Maria’ and Millard’s song ‘Waiting,’ were sung in a manner by Madame Hoffman which called rapturous applause from the audience, as a just tribute to a rare, pure and well cultivated voice. The celebrated ‘Shadow Song,’ sung by Mrs. C. Farnum, although showing fine execution and well trained powers, lacked in real musical notes and natural sweetness of voice. ‘My Angel’ and ‘Gute Nacht’ by Habelmann, the songs by the favorite baritone Hall, the brilliant music by Comellas and Barili, the pianists, and Alfred Hoffman, the violinist, were marked features of the evening, which tended to the general musical contentment of the audience.”

3)
Review: New-York Daily Tribune, 06 May 1869, 5.

“Though the concert of Madame Varian Hoffman, last evening offered us no surprises, it was still evidently enjoyed by the elegant numbers who attended it. Its special success was her own rich, if not brightly sympathetic expression of Gounod’s ‘Ave Maria gratia plena’—a piece rather to be distinguished as ecclesiastical than lyrical, it being a translation to music of the common prayer of the Catholic Churches. It was well adapted to a certain dignity which the voice of Madame Hoffman possesses, even if it may be said to lack occasionally in the emotional quality. Her presence is cold but charming, and what with her acknowledged talents for the concert stage, have won her some devoted admirers. We are not in love with such compositions as the Lucretia Borgia duo for violin and piano of her assistant, Mr. Comellas. As a class they go far to confuse and spoil the performance of two very good instruments, and for this reason we would have liked to have heard Mr. Comellas’s graceful and appreciative violin in a solo. Mr. Mills’s several piano pieces were, of course, much admired last night, and Mrs. Farnham sang with success the difficult and very spirited Venzano Waltz, laying her audience afterward under obligation by an encore of ‘Home, Sweet Home.’ Herr Habellman’s songs were the tenor feature of the programme.”