Thomas Popular Musical Matinee: 1st

Event Information

Venue(s):
Irving Hall

Conductor(s):
Theodore Thomas [see also Thomas Orchestra]
Emanuele Muzio

Price: $.50; $2 for family or season tickets

Event Type:
Orchestral

Performance Forces:
Instrumental, Vocal

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
8 February 2018

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

24 Oct 1863, Matinee

Program Details

Those who purchased a ticket for First Gottschalk Concert on 10/19/63 received a free ticket for this performance.

The family or season tickets for $2 admitted one person six times or six people once.

Gounod's Faust waltz was encored.

Performers and/or Works Performed

2)
aka Creatures of Prometheus; Geschopfe des Prometheus; Prometheus overture
Composer(s): Beethoven
Participants:  Thomas Orchestra
3)
Composer(s): Mozart
Participants:  Thomas Orchestra
4)
Composer(s): Bellini [composer]
Participants:  Thomas Orchestra;  Lucy Simons
5)
aka Illusions perdues; Fantome de bonheur
Composer(s): Gottschalk
Participants:  Louis Moreau Gottschalk
6)
Composer(s): Gottschalk
Participants:  Louis Moreau Gottschalk
7)
aka Bergère et cavalier; Young shepherdess and the knight; Gay shepherdess and the knight
Composer(s): Gottschalk
Participants:  Louis Moreau Gottschalk
8)
Composer(s): Verdi
Participants:  Thomas Orchestra
9)
Composer(s): Strauss
Participants:  Thomas Orchestra
10)
aka Faust, redowa
Composer(s): Gounod
Participants:  Thomas Orchestra
11)
aka Oberlaendler; Oberländler
Composer(s): Gung'l
Participants:  Thomas Orchestra
12)
Composer(s): Sanderson
13)
Composer(s): Strauss
Participants:  Thomas Orchestra
14)
aka Oberon, or The Elf King’s Oath; Overture d'Oberon [after Weber]
Composer(s): Gottschalk

Citations

1)
: The American Orchestra and Theodore Thomas [Russell], 0000, 53.
Provided the program and performers for this concert.
2)
: Theodore Thomas, vol 2 [eds. Upton and Stein], 0000, 78.
Provided the program and performers for this concert.
3)
Announcement: New-York Times, 14 September 1863.

Advertises four concerts in the series, but there were ten.

“Mr. Theodore Thomas will give four grand orchestral concerts during the season, preceded by four public rehearsals.  The programme will contain several novelties, and will be interpreted by the ample and liberal means which this gentleman places at the service of the public on such occasions.  The orchestra will be of colossal proportions, and of the finest material.  An efficient chorus will also take part in the entertainments.”

4)
Announcement: Dwight's Journal of Music, 03 October 1863.

Announces four concerts in the series, but there were ten.

“Mr. Theodore Thomas will give four grand orchestral concerts, and as many public rehearsals, at Irving Hall, with the addition of a full chorus.”

5)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 14 October 1863, 7.

“Special Notice: Each purchaser of a reserved seat for the evening [Gottschalk] concerts will be presented with a ticket of admission for the First Popular Saturday Afternoon Concert, Oct. 24, under the direction of Mr. Theodore Thomas, and at which Mr. Gottschalk will perform, together, with a powerful array of talent.”

6)
Announcement: New-York Times, 15 October 1863.

“Several new morceaux will be introduced by Mr. Gottschalk, and the patrons of the first concert will receive a bonus in the shape of a free admission to Mr. Theodore Thomas’ first grand popular concert on the following Saturday.”

7)
Announcement: New York Herald, 19 October 1863.

“These concerts are deserving of popular patronage, as they are to be the medium for the encouragement of native talent.”

8)
Announcement: New-York Times, 19 October 1863.

“The first of Mr. Theodore Thomas’ series of popular afternoon Concerts will take place at Irving Hall on Saturday afternoon.  The programme is admirable.  It contains a judicious admixture of classical and popular music, and can boast of the cooperation of Mr. Gottschalk, the eminent pianist.”

9)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 20 October 1863, 7.

For Gottschalk at Irving Hall on 10/22/63.

"SPECIAL NOTICE.--Each purchaser of a reserved seat will receive a ticket of admission for the first popular Saturday afternoon concert, Oct. 24, under the direction of Mr. THEODORE THOMAS, and at which Mr. GOTTSCHALK will perform."

10)
Announcement: New York Post, 22 October 1863.
“The programme is attractive, and contains a judicious combination of classical and popular music.”
11)
Announcement: New York Post, 23 October 1863.

12)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 23 October 1863, 7.

“The great pianist will perform together with Miss Lucy Simons, soprano pupil of Signor Muzio, and whose début on Monday evening last was so eminently successful. . . . The programme will be entirely new, comprising a symphony, overtures, selections from the operas, waltzes, polka, and quadrilles.”

13)
Announcement: New York Herald, 24 October 1863, 7.

Announces four concerts in the series, but there were ten.

“Mr. Theodore Thomas will give four grand orchestral concerts during the season, preceded by four public rehearsals.  The programme will contain several novelties, and will be interpreted by the ample and liberal means which this gentleman places at the service of the public on such occasions.  The orchestra will be of colossal proportions, and of the finest material.  An efficient chorus will also take part in the entertainments.”

14)
Announcement: New-York Times, 24 October 1863, 4.
“We direct attention to Mr. Theodore Thomas’ first musical matinee to-day at Irving Hall.  It is the inauguration of a new species of entertainment, and one which we hope to see flourish here.  In all the capitals of Europe there are local orchestras where the immediate music of the day is presented to the public in its most powerful and pleasing form.  In Paris there is the orchestra of Musard; in London, Mr. Alfred Mellon has recently succeeded to the baton of poor M. Julien, and has wielded it with so much acceptance to the public that the largest establishment in the English metropolis was crowded for more than two months.  In Vienna, the brothers Strauss play not only every night, but frequently several times a night, before delighted audiences who follow them from one part of the city to the other.  Elsewhere in Germany, in France, and in England, there are orchestras where light music and that which is called classical can be heard.  The effect on the public taste is always beneficial.  An orchestra, in fact, is the ultimate demand of all cultivated communities; it gives to music the fullest expression of which it is capable and inculcates a principal of largeness which is healthy and instructive and never to be forgotten. The audience that has once arisen to a full appreciation of the orchestra can never descend to a lower range of feeling.  Mr. Theodore Thomas’ orchestra is equal in numbers to that of Strauss, an in the individual excellence of the players superior to it.  He has, in addition, the cooperation of the greatest pianist now before the public—Mr. Gottschalk, a host in himself.  Miss Lucy Simons, too, a young lady whose début on Monday last was an ovation from the public and the profession, will appear for the second time to-day. . . . It will be seen at once that this programme is instructive as well as entertaining.  The public, we hope, will lend a helping hand to an enterprise which means good to art and enjoyment to the community.”
15)
Announcement: Courrier des États-Unis, 24 October 1863.

“Ms. Simons, the young pupil of M. Muzio [performs today].  She made a great impression at her debut on Monday.”

16)
Review: New-York Times, 26 October 1863, 8.

“The weather was unfavorable on Saturday, when Mr. Theodore Thomas gave his first popular concert, but there was, not withstanding, a very fair audience, sufficient, at all events, to demonstrate that under more favorable auspices the Hall would have been completely crowded.  Mr. Theodore Thomas has engaged an exceedingly efficient orchestra, composed of the very best players in the City; the ensemble is excellent, and could hardly be improved.  Mr. Thomas was assisted by Miss Lucy Simons, whose début on Tuesday last was so eminently successful, and by Messrs. Gottschalk and Sanderson on the piano.  The programme contained all sorts of music, opening with an overture by Beethoven and ending with a quadrille by Strauss.  A symphony by Mozart (No. 3 in E flat) was excellently rendered; and a charming trifle called the ‘Aurora Polka’ received the nicest attention.  Miss Simons sang with great brilliancy and was encored in Gounod’s Waltz.  Mr. Gottschalk played superbly, and played often, being recalled after each piece.  The entertainment was, in all respects, successful.”

17)
Review: Courrier des États-Unis, 26 October 1863.

“It’s nearly superfluous to say that the reappearance of Gottschalk got a brilliant ovation; but what is more new and more interesting from the point of view of art is the transformation that has appeared to me to have come about in the attitude of the great pianist. Some hearings behind closed doors have already evoked this impression in me; it was confirmed upon hearing him in public. One does not know enough whether in addition to being a first-class performer and an ingenious and prolific composer there is in Gottschalk a passionate and untiring seeker. Setting out in pursuit of an ideal whose sensations possess and torment him, he explores in turn all the paths by which he believes he can attain it. At one point—it was two years ago and I said it at the time—one could have believed that he had lost his way. His performances and his playing threatened to lose in clarity what they were gaining in brilliance. Today, one recognizes that this was simply an intermediate stage through which his skill passed. The new compositions that he produced in those days and the fashion in which he interpreted them foretold that Gottschalk would arrive at a third phase in his artistic life. It isn’t any more the fascinating--but a bit effeminate--delicacy of the first period that we knew; it’s not the exuberant virility, that goes too far through an excess of vigor, that he pursued; the qualities and the faults of this double past are in some ways melded together, and from this fortunate mixture there breaks loose a purified talent, released from the hindrances that he was saddled with one after another. After having alternatively possessed charm and power, feeling and vigor, delicacy and depth, Gottschalk seems to have finally found the secret of uniting them. Everybody was struck by the change that has been accomplished in him, and although few people could probably take account of it, each has submitted to its charm. Also, his success, which would have appeared to reach its apogee, has soared to new heights which are growing in proportion as the transformation to which I have testified is noticed. Two singers who have made their debuts under his auspices are owed particular mention. They are both Americans and students of M. Muzio, to whom they do great honor. The first, Miss Lucy Simons, possesses a pure, flexible and clear soprano voice, that she handles with remarkable security and steadiness. The second, Mistress Motte, is a mezzo soprano, touching on contralto, with excellent timbre and extraordinary fullness. If the future holds the promises of the present, there is the stuff of two artists of good quality. I wouldn’t say as much about Mlle Louise Vivier, who has for her principal merit first-rate self-possession and a mad love of music which the latter doesn’t give back to her. They assure us that this name on the programme hides that of a woman of the world, gifted with a lovely family and a rich husband. I congratulate her, but I stick to what I said above.”

       Saturday, at [Irving Hall], M. Theodore Thomas’s popular and classical matinees, an excellent institution for which perhaps one must not count on a success by infatuation but which will establish itself by degrees on a solid base, were inaugurated. To counteract, from the point of view of receipts, terrible weather, the first of these concerts was excellent and a good prediction for the future.”

18)
Review: Dwight's Journal of Music, 31 October 1863, 127.

Part of review of multiple events.

            “New York, Oct. 26.—The week closed with ‘Ione,’ Theo. Thomas’s matinée, and the Philharmonic rehearsal, with the usual Philharmonic storm. Notwithstanding the unpropitious state of the weather, the attendance at each of these performances was very good. At Irving Hall, Mr. Theo. Thomas inaugurated a series of matinées, which promise great popularity. The programme, which was interpreted by thirty of the most accomplished performers in the city, included [lists part of the program].”