Sunday Evening Concert: 12th

Event Information

Venue(s):
Steinway Hall

Manager / Director:
H. L. [impressario] Bateman
Lafayette F. Harrison

Conductor(s):
Theodore Thomas [see also Thomas Orchestra]

Price: $.50; $1 reserved

Event Type:
Orchestral

Performance Forces:
Instrumental, Vocal

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
8 January 2018

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

18 Nov 1866, 8:00 PM

Program Details

After listing their names in several advertisements and announcements, the New York Herald reports that Brignoli and Ferranti did not sing. The New York Sun reports that Brignoli sang, but does not describe his performance.

Performers and/or Works Performed

2)
aka Und ob die Wolke sie verhülle; And even if clouds; Agathe’s prayer; Preghiera
Composer(s): Weber
Participants:  Euphrosyne Parepa
3)
Composer(s): Handel
Participants:  Euphrosyne Parepa
5)
Composer(s): Unknown composer
Participants:  Sebastian Bach Mills
6)
Composer(s): Schumann
Participants:  Sebastian Bach Mills
7)
Composer(s): Chopin
Participants:  Sebastian Bach Mills
8)
Composer(s): Mercadante
Participants:  Signor Fortuna
9)
Composer(s): Mercadante
Participants:  Signor Fortuna
10)
Composer(s): Rossini
Participants:  Signor Fortuna
11)
Composer(s): Wallace
Participants:  Thomas Orchestra
12)
aka March; Fest march; Grand march; Tannhauser. Freudig begrussen wir die edle Halle. Allegro
Composer(s): Wagner
Participants:  Thomas Orchestra

Citations

1)
Announcement: New York Herald, 15 November 1866, 4.

Part of review for the popular concert series at Steinway Hall. "On Sunday next the second grand sacred concert [meaning, the second held at Steinway Hall, not the second of the series] will take place. The entire Bateman troupe, Paprea, Brignoli, &c., will assist."

2)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 15 November 1866.
3)
Announcement: New-York Times, 15 November 1866, 5.

Brief. "The twelfth Sunday concert will again introduce the Bateman Troupe--Mme. Parepa, Signor Brignoli, &c., &c. We may anticipate a jam equal to that of last Sunday, and would urge our readers to procure their tickets in advance."

4)
Advertisement: New-York Times, 15 November 1866, 7.
5)
Advertisement: New-Yorker Staats-Zeitung und Herold, 16 November 1866.
6)
Announcement: New-York Times, 17 November 1866, 4.

"Sunday Concert.--The twelfth Sunday concert takes place at Steinway Hall to-morrow evening. The programme is full of interesting matter. It will be interpreted by the members of the Bateman troupe--Mme. Parepa, Sig. Brignoli, Sig. Ferranti, Sig. Fortuna, Mr. S.B. Mills, Mr. Carl Rosa, &c. As this is the last occasion of these great artists appearing at a Sunday cocnert until their return from the country, where Mr. Bateman, proposes to make ap rotracted tour, we may anticipate an overwhelming attendance. It cannot well be larger than it was last Sunday, but we would suggest to our readers that much delay and annoyance may be saved by obtaining their tickets at the music-stores, instead of waiting to get them at the doors."

7)
Announcement: New-York Daily Tribune, 17 November 1866, 5.

"SUNDAY EVENING CONCERTS.

To-morrow evening the usual popular Sunday evening concert will take place at Steinway Hall in Fourteenth-st. On this occasion the whole of the Bateman Concert Company, including Mlle. Parepa and Signor Brignoli, will appear, in addition to Mr. Theodore Thomas's Orchestra. There will be, of course, a great rush for seats, judging by the brilliant and overflowing audience present last Sunday evening, when the same attraction was presented. Those, therefore, who wish seats should attend early."

8)
Announcement: New York Herald, 18 November 1866, 5.

Brief; at conclusion of review for the Philharmonic Society at Steinway Hall. "The entire Bateman troupe will take part in the twelfth Sunday concert at the same hall this evening."

9)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 18 November 1866.

Brignoli’s name has been removed, but not Ferranti’s.

10)
Announcement: New-York Times, 18 November 1866, 5.

"Steinway Hall.--Our readers must not forget that the twelfth Sunday concert, under the direction of Messrs. H.L. Bateman and L.F. Harrison, takes place to-night. All the grand artists of the Bateman troupe assist in the programme. It will, we believe, be the last opportunity of hearing them at a Sunday concert, and the occasion should be remembered by those who desire to hear the best councert troupe in the country--perhaps in the world."

11)
Review: New York Herald, 19 November 1866, 5.

“There was no diminution in the audience last evening at Messrs. Harrison and Bateman’s Sunday concert. The hall was completely filled. Signori Brignoli and Ferranti did not sing, but Madame Parepa, although evidently suffering in voice from the effects of traveling in the cars the night previous, was a sufficient attraction. She sang the beautiful little aria, ‘Und ob die Wolke,’ from the Freischutz, ‘From Mighty Kings,’ from Judas Maccabeus, and the soprano part in an Ave Maria, arranged by Gounod, for soprano, violin, piano and organ, from Bach’s first prelude in C. Carl Rosa played the adagio from Spohr’s concerto in G major, with much taste and breadth of tone. He seems to improve in the latter quality at each concert. Mr. S. B. Mills played the African fantasia and a couple of little studies by Schumann and Chopin. Signor Fortuna sang the airs ‘Della Vita’ and ‘Alla Pace,’ by Mercadante, and ‘Pro Peccatis,’ from Rossini’s Stabat Mater. The orchestral pieces were the overture to Maritana, and the Tannhauser march.”

12)
Review: New York Sun, 19 November 1866.

“Last evening the Philharmonic Society was succeeded at Steinway’s by Mr. Bateman’s Concert Troupe. This company appeared at Mr. Harrison’s twelfth Sunday musical entertainment.

These performances, we are glad to see are no longer called ‘sacred’ concerts. The music given at them is anything but sacred, though excellent in character and in rendition. At last evening’s concert Signor Brignoli and Madame Parepa appeared.

It is extraordinary that with such a hall under his control, and with such artists in the country, and such choral and orchestral societies in the city, (all of which must be obtainable at least once a week,) that Mr. Harrison does not institute a series of ‘Weekly Popular Concerts,’ where familiar music should be performed in the best style, and to which the utmost admission price ought to be fifty cents. Such an entertainment must be given here at a day not far distant, and whoever originates it will make his fortune. A hall double the size of Steinway’s would be too small to accommodate the crowds it would attract every night it was given.

Mr. Bateman has taken a hint which we have repeatedly given, and advertises what he calls ‘Popular Concerts’ for every Monday and Wednesday. Admission 50 cents. But there is a certain amount of deceit about these which must result in ultimate loss of popular confidence in the proprietor. Mr. Bateman’s name having been previously connected with the troupe which includes Brignoli, Parepa and other first class artists, the public naturally expects the appearance of these great singers at the ‘popular concerts—Admission 50 cents’—but when they attend and discover that the entertainment to which they have come, though good, is far inferior to what they looked for—that the artists are new beginners, or worse, servants—and that not a member of the real Bateman troupe appears, they are, to say the least, disappointed. We do not think that the deception has been intentional, but nevertheless it is natural, when Bateman’s name is associated with ‘popular concerts,’ for the public to look for Bateman’s troupe [illeg.] and the feeling is one of [illeg.] rather than regret when it is discovered that Mr. B. has reserved his great artists for his dollar and a half concerts, and gives the fifty cent people only fifty cent singers.

Such concerts can never become ‘popular,’ however good the music.

If they had been advertised simply as a continuation (as they really are) of Mr. Harrison’s pleasant ‘Musical Evenings’ which that worthy and honorable manager instituted during the past two Winters at Irving Hall—where all that is good in rising American talent was given a hearing—they would have excited no higher anticipation and would have caused no disappointments.”

13)
Review: New-York Times, 19 November 1866, 4.

“The twelfth Sunday Concert under the direction of Messrs. H. L. Bateman and L. F. Harrison was given last night at Steinway Hall. There was no diminution in the numbers present, but, on the contrary, an accession thereto. Every available place in the hall, up stairs and down stairs was occupied, and many unfortunates were turned away. The programme did not contain any novelty of special moment, but it was nevertheless an interesting one, and calculated to show off the best qualities of the company. It was rendered faultlessly, and with such expedition that the twelve numbers had been given before 10 o’clock. Mme. Parepa was in superb voice, and paid the penalty for that condition by being compelled to sing each morceau twice. The ‘labor we delight in physics pain,’ and we have no doubt Mme. Parepa is tranquil under the infliction. Mr. Mills played his three pieces with perfect skill, and was, as usual, heartily applauded. Mr. Rosa again astonished his admirers by the marked progress which he has made in the skillful and artistic use of his instrument. These three artists, accompanied by the fine musician and pianist, Mr. J. L. Hatton, gave a full and beautiful reading of the ‘Ave Maria,’ by Gounod—Mr. Hatton playing the cabinet organ. The subject is taken from that mine of inexhaustible melody, Bach, and is elaborated by Gounod with the taste and skill of a true musician. We have rarely listened to anything more agreeable.  The orchestra, as heretofore, was under the direction of Mr. Theodore Thomas, and contributed in no small degree to the pleasure of the evening.”