Bateman and Harrison Wednesday Popular Concert: 3rd

Event Information

Venue(s):
Steinway Hall

Manager / Director:
H. L. [impressario] Bateman
Lafayette F. Harrison

Conductor(s):
John Liptrot Hatton

Price: $1 reserved

Performance Forces:
Instrumental, Vocal

Record Information

Status:
Published

Last Updated:
12 December 2017

Performance Date(s) and Time(s)

21 Nov 1866, 8:00 PM

Program Details

Some of the citations record this as the second concert in the series; owing to an issue with scheduling on Mondays and Wednesdays, Music in Gotham counts this as the third. For an explanation of this discrepancy, see the program details of Bateman and Harrison Wednesday Popular Concert: 1st on 11/12/66.

This is the only concert of the series not to feature Theodore Thomas and the Thomas Orchestra. The citations do not explain why or name the ensemble/accompanist that performed instead.

This is advertised as the final appearance of the Bateman Concert Troupe before it goes on tour, but some artists return to perform in this series again (see Bateman and Harrison Wednesday Popular Concert: 12th on 1/23/67).

Although scheduled to perform, Brignoli did not sing on account of an ongoing indisposition. He was scheduled to sing "Vieni al mar" with Parepa, "Goodbye, sweetheart, goodbye" and "Sogani;" Signor Fortuna took his place in at least the first of these selections. It is unclear if these works were dropped from the program, sung by other performers, or replaced with other works.

Parepa sang "Where the bee sucks" as an encore.

Mills played "The Murmuring fountain" as an encore.

Performers and/or Works Performed

2)
Composer(s): Bellini [composer]
Participants:  Euphrosyne Parepa
3)
aka Shadow dance; Schattentanz; Shadow song
Composer(s): Meyerbeer
Text Author: Barbier, Carré
Participants:  Euphrosyne Parepa
4)
Composer(s): Arne
Participants:  Euphrosyne Parepa
5)
Composer(s): Gordigiani
6)
Composer(s): Hatton
Text Author: Williams
Participants:  Pasquale Brignoli
7)
Composer(s): Schira
Participants:  Pasquale Brignoli
8)
Composer(s): Mercadante
Participants:  Signor Fortuna
9)
Composer(s): Rossini
Participants:  Signor Ferranti
11)
Composer(s): Mercadante
Participants:  Signor Fortuna
12)
aka Mendelssohn's Wedding march; Fantasie on Midsummer night's dream
Composer(s): Liszt
Participants:  Sebastian Bach Mills
13)
Composer(s): Mills
Participants:  Sebastian Bach Mills
14)
Composer(s): Mills
Participants:  Sebastian Bach Mills
15)
Composer(s): Beriot
Participants:  Sebastian Bach Mills;  Carl Rosa
16)
Composer(s): Rosa
Participants:  Carl Rosa

Citations

1)
Advertisement: New York Herald, 14 November 1866.

Also cites cities for upcoming tour.

2)
Advertisement: New-Yorker Staats-Zeitung und Herold, 18 November 1866, 8.
3)
Announcement: New York Herald, 19 November 1866, 5.
4)
Announcement: New-York Times, 19 November 1866, 4.

Brief. "The second [sic] Wednesday popular concert takes place at the same hall [Steinway Hall] on Wednesday next. We shall take another opportunity of referring to the programme."

5)
Announcement: New-York Times, 21 November 1866, 5.

"Wednesday Popular Concert.--The second [sic] Wednesday popular concert takes place at Steinway Hall to-night, when all the artists of the Bateman troupe again take part in the programme. This will be the last opportunity of hearing Mme. Parepa, Signor Brignoli, &c., the groupe taking its departure immediately for Philadelphia, Baltimore and the Southwest. It is the only occasion too when such artists can be heard at popular prices--fifty cents."

6)
Announcement: New-York Daily Tribune, 21 November 1866, 5.
7)
Announcement: New-Yorker Staats-Zeitung und Herold, 21 November 1866, 8.
8)
Review: New-Yorker Musik-Zeitung, 22 November 1866, 250.

The concerts of Harrison & Bateman have been attracting large audiences and are the highlights of the winter season. The audience members are dressed in fancy wardrobe, which shows that even the wealthy people prefer to pay less admission.

9)
Review: New York Herald, 22 November 1866, 7.

Brief. “A physician’s certificate was read by Mr. Bateman to excuse the absence of Signor Brignoli.”

10)
Review: New-York Daily Tribune, 22 November 1866, 5.

“The announcement of the last appearance of Madame Parepa and the other fine artists of the Bateman Concert Company had the effect of drawing out a vast attendance last night, at the Wednesday evening popular concert at Steinway’s Hall. Just such a throng should have been present every night that they appeared. It was a brilliant and enthusiastic audience and certainly the excellence of the performance fully justified the enthusiasm so warmly expressed.

Madame Parepa, the reigning Queen of the Concert room, was in superb voice, and we all know how superb that voice is in its rich and melodious purity. We have rarely heard her sing so well, and doubt if she ever surpassed her performance of last evening. Her ‘Qui la voce’ was a model for grace, expression and melodious purity. No one can carry the voice so finely, and no artist that we are acquainted with at present has so thorough and so easy a control of every vocal resource. She was rapturously encored, and responded by singing in her most simple but finished manner Arne's lovely aria, ‘Where the Bee Sucks.’ Madame Parepa was successful in all her selections, and never even in her first engagement was the enthusiasm of the public more warm and more genuine.

Brignoli not having recovered from the sickness from which he has suffered for several days, was unable to appear; some dissatisfaction was expressed, but the production of Dr. Carnochan's certificate by Mr. Bateman satisfied every one.

Mr. S. B. Mills played Liszt's ‘Midsummer Night's Dream’ in a brilliant, accurate and effective manner, and won a hearty encore, to which he responded by playing his very sweet Morceau de Salon, Murmuring Fountains.

Signori Fortuna and Ferranti and Carl Rosa came in for a full share of the public admiration and deserved the reception they met with. This concert, with the exception of the Brignoli disappointment, was a complete and brilliant success, and makes us regret that we are to lose these admirable artists for an indefinite period.”